generalist practice

LEARNING RESOURCES

· Toseland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (2017). An introduction to group work practice (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

· Chapter 7, “The Group Begins” (pp. 196–229)

Post the following:

· Explain how two concepts in practice might help facilitate client support and cooperation. Provide examples.

Respond to two colleagues who selected a different group concept.

· Explain how you might employ your colleague’s concept or how a concept you chose might complement your colleague’s choice.

RESPONSE1

Explain how two concepts in practice might help facilitate client support and cooperation. Provide examples.

Modeling and role play are valuable skills for groups. Some people understand things much better when seeing what is being said. When you can demonstrate the problem, it could lead to a conversation on how to deal with the situation. “The action skills of modeling, role-playing, and rehearsing situations in the group can be helpful in both task and treatment groups. Modeling refers to the worker or a member demonstrating behaviors in a particular situation so that others in the group can observe what to do and how to do it” (Toseland & Rivas, 2017).

An example is writing out all the responsibilities of caregivers in a caregiver group and then explaining how self-care is crucial because the many responsibilities can become heavy. Sometimes, the actual visual of seeing what one does is more realistic to that person. The reality of seeing all that goes into a caregiver’s job can help them see that they must take care of themselves.

Collective listening and empathy can play an influential role in a group setting. “The group reflective models used in the program invite a non-judgmental approach, which embraces difference and deep attentive listening with empathy” Stemple & Fairclough (2018, as cited in Williams et al., 2022). Collective listening and empathy give care and kindness, and not being judgmental.

An example would be in a group of caregivers; members can paraphrase and reemphasize what was said and share what they have experienced. They can connect with the other members by listening and letting them know that they have walked in their shoes before, so they, therefore, understand. It makes it more of a group than working out the problem and not just the individual sharing alone.

 

References:

Toseland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (2017). An introduction to group work practice (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

Williams, J., Ruch, G., & Jennings, S. (2022). Creating the conditions for collective curiosity and containment: insights from developing and delivering reflective groups with social work supervisors. Journal of Social Work Practice, 36(2), 195–207.

RESPONSE2

Explain how two concepts in practice might help facilitate client support and cooperation. Provide examples.

One concept in practice is having a support system. Though some people love having a support system and some struggle with having it. When people are sick, they often have people check on them, it can be family, close friends, coworker, or neighbor. Some people experience anxiety if people check on them too often, they may become sicker (Johnston & Terp, 2019). Those clients that do enjoy support will embrace the support and the supporter even more
.

 

Facilitating task and social-emotional aspects of the groups helps the to focus on task accomplishments (Toseland & Rivas, 2017). Being able to work through tension. Groups can appreciate meeting their goals that they have set. Goal setting can get the social worker client support and cooperation.

 

References

Johnston, L., & Terp, D. M. (2019). Support is a Complicated Concept: A Social Work Practice Reflection on Support and Anxiety. 
Clinical Social Work Journal.

Toseland, R. W., & Rivas, R. F. (2017). 
An Introduction to Group Work Practice 8th Edition. Boston, MA: Pearson.

 

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